THUNKS

Thunks- Questions to make your brain go ouch!

http://www.thunks.co.uk/Default.aspx?Page=1


Math Questions

Before Answering a Problem

  • What information in the problem is NOT important in finding a solution?
  • -What is the question in this problem?
  • -How can I represent this problem using real-life applications?
  • -How can I represent this problem using manipulatives?
  • -How can I be certain there is enough information to solve this problem?
  • -What is the first step I should take in solving this problem?
  • -How can I evaluate this problem to determine what information is important in solving it?  
  • -Does it make sense to solve this problem by creating a picture or diagram?  Why or why not?
  • -What rules or algorithms can I apply to this problem?
  • -Does it make sense to solve this problem by writing an equation?  Why or why not?
  • -Using my knowledge of mathematics, how can I estimate a solution to this problem?
  • -Which strategy makes the most sense in solving this problem: drawing a picture, guessing and checking, finding a pattern, or writing an equation?
  • -Does it make sense to solve this problem by guessing and checking?  Why or why not?
  • -What is essential information can I identify in this problem?
  • -What patterns exist in this problem that might help me in solving it?
  • -Does it make sense to solve this problem by finding a pattern?  Why or why not?

After Answering a Problem

  • How can I describe my solution to this problem in three steps?
  • -How is this problem like and unlike other problems I have solved?
  • -How can I use my knowledge of mathematics to predict a set of incorrect solutions to this problem?
  • -How can I use my knowledge of mathematics to check my procedures for solving this problem?
  • -How can I solve this problem another way?
  • -Can I prove that this problem cannot be solved using the information given?  How?
  • -What are likely errors people might make in solving this problem?
  • -How can I be certain that my answer makes sense?
  • -How can I describe my solution to this problem in five steps?
  • -What math concepts can I apply to this problem?
  • -How can I clearly explain my solution to a friend? 
  • -Do I require additional information to solve this problem?  What information?
  • -How can I create a problem like this one that is more difficult to solve?
  • -How can I create a problem like this one that is easier to solve?
  • -How can I represent this problem using real-life applications?
  • -What number relationships are important in this problem?
  • -How can I clearly explain my solution using math symbols?
  • -How can I check to be certain my answer is correct?
  • -How can I use my knowledge of mathematics to check the accuracy of my computations?
  • -Using my knowledge of number sense, how can I check to see if my solution is reasonable?
  • -What similar problem can I create?
  • -How can I clearly explain my solution in writing?
  • -How can I represent this problem using manipulatives?
  • -What rule or procedure can I suggest after solving this problem?
  • -How can I be certain that my answer is correct?
  • -What math vocabulary can I apply to this problem?

ELA Guiding Questions

Fiction Features:

Setting

  • -How does the setting of the story make you feel?
  • -What mood does the author establish in the story?  How does the author accomplish this?
  • -What details would you include in a drawing of the setting of the story?
  • -Why would the author choose this setting for these characters and this problem?
  • -What three question s would you ask the author about the setting of the story?
  • -How could your transfer this story to your neighborhood?
  • -How do you know when this story takes place?
  • -What details does the author provide about the setting of the story?

Characters

  • -What do you learn about the main character from what other characters say about him or her?
  • -Suppose the main character lived in your neighborhood.  What kids of adventures might he or she have here?
  • -At what point in the story do you begin to like or dislike the main character?
  • -Which other character in the story is most important to the main character?
  • -What do you learn about the main character from what he or she says?
  • -How would you describe the main character to someone who has not read this story?
  • -What do you learn about the main character from his or her actions?
  • -In what ways are the characters in the story important to each other?
  • -At what point in the story does the main character do someone surprising?
  • -In addition to the main character, how are the other characters important to the story?
  • -How does the main character remind you of someone from our class?
  • -Would you choose the main character to be your friend?
  • -What three adjectives would best describe the main character?
  • -In what ways does the main character remind you of other characters from other stories we have read?
  • -What advice would you give the main character about something that happens in the story?
  • -What characters from this story might you use in your own writing?

 

Problem/Solution

  • -In what other ways might the problem in the story have been resolved?
  • -What solution to the problem in the story does the author present?
  • -Are you most likely to remember the characters, the setting, or the problem from the story?
  • -What details does the author give to introduce the problem in the story?
  • -At what point in the story are you sure what the problem is?
  • -In what ways does this story seem realistic or unrealistic to you?
  • -How does the main character resolve the problem in the story?
  • -Choose the three most important events, one from the beginning or the story, the middle, and the end.
  • -Have you ever faced a problem like this presented in this story?
  • -At what point in the story has the problem been resolved?
  • -What is the problem faced by the characters in this story?
  • -What message do you believe the author wants you to remember from this story?
  • -Is the problem in this story more about a conflict between characters -or- a conflict within a character?
  • -What other stories have we read about similar problems?
  • -Summarize this story in two or three sentences.

 

Author’s Purpose

  • -What kinds of descriptive words does the author use to make the story seem real?
  • -What is your favorite sentence in the story? Why?
  • -What does the author seem to know a great deal about?
  • -In what ways does this story remind you of other stories we have read?
  • -What have you learned about writing from this story that you can use in your own stories?
  • -What kind of person do you think that the author is?
  • -From whose point of view is the story told?
  • -If you could ask this author two questions, what would they be?
  • -If you were describing the way this author writes to someone, what would you say?
  • -Would you choose to read another story by this author?
  • -What makes this author’s writing different from other stories we have read?
  • -How does the author make you want to keep reading the story?
  • -If you had written this story, how would you have made it different?
  • -How would you describe the feeling or tone of this story?
  • -What kinds of readers would most enjoy this story? 

NON FICTION FEATURES

Text Features

  • -What text feature does the author use most effectively?
  • -How do the text features used in this text help you know what the main idea is?
  • -What three text features could the author add to help you better understand this text?
  • -Which text features are most helpful to you in writing a summary of this text?
  • -Looking at the text features before reading the text, what questions probably are NOT answered in this text?
  • -If you were editing this text, what print features might you add to help others understand it?
  • -Looking at the text features before reading the text, what questions are probably answered in this text?
  • -What text features does the author use most to help organize this text?
  • -Where in this text could the author add a chart, graph, table, and/or diagram?
  • -How does the title of this text help you predict what the main idea or message is?

Text Organization

  • -What questions does this text answer well?
  • -What questions are NOT answered by this text?
  • -Using your prior knowledge, what information in this text do you agree with?
  • -What details would you include in a summary of this text?
  • -Using you prior knowledge what information in this text do you want to argue with?
  • -What information would you NOT include in a summary of this text?
  • -How is the information in this text organized to help you to understand it?
  • -How did you use your prior knowledge to help you to understand or respond to this text?
  • -What evidence suggests that the text is organized by sequence of events?
  • -What did you learn from reading this text that surprised you?
  • -What evidence suggests that the text is organized by main ideas/details?

Author’s Purpose

  • -What clues does the author give about his/her purpose in sharing this text?
  • -How does the author establish the tone of the text?
  • -How does the author want you to respond to -or- use this text?
  • -What words or phrases does the author use to show that he/she knows much about the topic?
  • -What was the author’s purpose for writing this text?
  • -Where in the text can you find evidence that the author is trying to persuade you to believe or do something?
  • -For what audiences do you believe this author is writing?
  • -Do you believe that the information in this text is believable?  Why or why not?
  • -Where in this text can you find evidence of the author’s opinion?
  • -What message does the author want you to remember from this text?

Mastery Matrix Support

This link will take you to the Fayette County Schools Centric Blog where you will find support for designing a Mastery Matrix to use in moving your students to master the  standards.

http://fayettecentricblog.wordpress.com


Literacy Tools

 


Deconstruction & Matrix Templates

 

Click the links here to access forms for Deconstructing your CSOs – Plus for a template for creating a Mastery Matrix.

These are example templates, and you may need to modify them to meet your needs.

FCS-Unwrapping Standards-Acuity Analysis

MATRIX-Template


OODLES of FREE WEBINARS

OODLES of FREE WEBINARS

http://www.thinkfinity.org/docs/DOC-10646
  • I have an iPad – Now What?
  • Mobile Devices in the Science Classroom
  • Android Tablets for Beginners
  • Edmodo as a Classroom Management Tool
  • Civil War Stories from Smithsonian’s History Explorer
New lessons from TED ED
  • Rapid Prototyping with Google Glass
  • Is light a particle or a wave?
  • What Aristotle and Joshua Bell can teach us about persuasion
  • How to defeat a dragon with Math
From TED

Courtesy

Mark Moore, WVDE


Instructional Strategies Resources

 

coop grouping

3-2-1

SummarizingStrategiesBooklet.pmd

Think-Pair-SharePartner-1

What is ThinkPairShare

Jigsaw in 10 Easy Steps

Managing the Cooperative Classroom

Cooperative Learning Techniques

Student Coop Group Rules-1


Data Analysis Resource

Data analysis, mastery matrix design, & implementation

Data Analysis-Ideas to mark your data sheets for impact

  • times tested piece is important….
  • where they had gains…. highlighted the ones where they had gains….
  • Next you analyze it the CSO was covered (is that why it was low
  • the first time and high on the second? 
  • highlight the scores over fifty.
  • next note concerns for the CSOs that they are still not mastering
  • Look again to see if they were high in times tested
  • Mark the CSOs that dropped.
  • Mark the CSO it was not tested in the second BM as perhaps it needs to be on matrix.

There are more DOK questions in eleventh grade math than any other subject… (However, our kids are still doing poorly in 11th grade math in Fayette County)

Remember this is rolled up data, so it also helps to look at student data too.

Think about your rough draft matrix design, then move to collaborative conversations to finalize your matrix, next design your assessment of your skill sets, and finally implementation, and follow-up.


Smarter Balanced Argumentative Rubric

 

http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/TaskItemSpecifications/EnglishLanguageArtsLiteracy/ELARubrics.pdf